Rightsizing copyright

iPodding judgeI have been on holiday and missed my weekly Economist, so this may already have been wall-to-wall blogged. Anyway, in its editorial comments on June 30, the magazine takes a strong stand against extending copyright protection:

In America, the length of copyright protection has increased enormously over the past century, from around 28 years to as much as 95 years. The same trend can be seen in other countries. In June Britain signalled that it may extend its copyright term from 50 years to around 90 years.
This makes no sense. Copyright was originally intended to encourage publication by granting publishers a temporary monopoly on works so they could earn a return on their investment. But the internet and new digital technologies have made the publication and distribution of works much easier and cheaper. Publishers should therefore need fewer, not more, property rights to protect their investment. Technology has tipped the balance in favour of the public domain.
A first, useful step would be a drastic reduction of copyright back to its original terms — 14 years, renewable once. This should provide media firms plenty of chance to earn profits, and consumers plenty of opportunity to rip, mix, burn their back catalogues without breaking the law. The Supreme Court has somewhat reluctantly clipped the wings of copyright pirates; it is time for Congress to do the same to the copyright incumbents.

Right on. And this from a magazine that knows economics, makes a comfortable living off intellectual property and makes quite few of its articles available for free.

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2 thoughts on “Rightsizing copyright

  1. Anonymous

    Flott artikkel frå The Economist! Det er klart at etablerte selskap har interesse av å forlenge kontrakta med samfunnet så lenge som mogleg, men for nye entrepenørar så er det klart ei ulempe. Og dei færraste selskapa planlegg 90 år framover i tid for sine investeringar, så det burde vere heilt unaudsynt med så lang copyright. Skal det kapitalistiske maskineriet få nok smøring i kunnskapssamfunnet så må det leggjast til rette for effektiv deling av idear og informasjon, og spesielt innan utdanning og forskning.

  2. Anonymous

    Flott artikkel frå The Economist! Det er klart at etablerte selskap har interesse av å forlenge kontrakta med samfunnet så lenge som mogleg, men for nye entrepenørar så er det klart ei ulempe. Og dei færraste selskapa planlegg 90 år framover i tid for sine investeringar, så det burde vere heilt unaudsynt med så lang copyright. Skal det kapitalistiske maskineriet få nok smøring i kunnskapssamfunnet så må det leggjast til rette for effektiv deling av idear og informasjon, og spesielt innan utdanning og forskning.

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